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Interview with Carmen Maria Machado, where she addresses the subject of writing as activism:-

As for the question of “activism,” I think that if you’re a woman, a queer person, a person of color, a non-cisgender person, a non-able-bodied person, etc., writing is inherently a form of activism because you’re staking a claim in a world that is not meant for you. When you try and put your work into the world, you’re saying “I think that what I have to say, in the way I say it, is so important that I am willing to try and get it to other people, no matter what it takes.” And that requires ego, in the best way possible. It requires that you take yourself and your craft and your voice seriously. When you’re not white, not male, not cisgender or straight or able-bodied, that ego is a radical act. So yes, the fact that I take myself seriously as an artist and do what I can to put my work out into the world is a form of activism.

Graveyard Shift Sisters interviews me!

From Eden Royce’s Blog:-

The Graveyard Shift Sister feature is back for 2016!

First up this year in this interview series is Tonya Liburd.

Tonya is an editor, author, and champion of people of color as fiction creators. I spoke with her about people of color behind the scenes in fiction and publishing, creating from a place of pain, and using your heritage and history in your writing.

As I’m sure several people who read this feature are creators themselves, I also asked her what publishers are tired of seeing. (There’s also a link to where you can submit your uber creative story as well!)

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The phenomenal Loretta Devine in Urban Legend.

Read the entire review and interview on the Graveyard Shift Sisters website.

Read the interview here:-

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On white feminists & black women stereotypes…

Useful note via Margarita Lau: it is white Western women that usually can get away with this, because the ability to violate social norms is a form of privilege. You can see it at conferences, where woc/non-Western women are dressed more professionally than white women, and white men are the sloppiest of all. Steve Jobs got away with wearing the same thing every day not because he was so above such nonsense as clothes but because he was a powerful man.

Also, the whole railing against traditional femininity thing is such a second – wave phenomenon. Like, fighting the patriarchy by adopting masculine modes of dress, speech, etc is really missing the point, and it has a quaint side-effect of casting feminine women as the enemy, instead of the whole machine of gendered oppression. Very common in academia, especially sciences, where traditionally feminine pursuits are scoffed at as superficial, and a woman loses 10 points of perceived IQ for every inch of heel. Put it together with the previous point, and you get a fun situation where the least privileged get shit from the mainstream for being “non-professional” if they step outside of the acceptable, and they also get shit from white feminists if they don’t! — via Ekaterina Sedia

(…I think Steve Jobs and others in Apple who dressed the same as he did were into differentiating Apple in branding, rather than the power aspect, although he still has a point with him, IMHO…)

Snippet

Words for today…

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And with the coldest blood, Azlanteca had almost overlaid my mind with a new, dark consciousness, a terrible superhuman logic. It was no wonder these… men had had an Adze puppet to so easily alter and manipulate. Because I had somehow resisted him, my mind had been left to its own devices, free. But I could easily have now been a stranger to myself.
“The old gods,” he pointed skywards, “up there, in space, where it is utterly cold, where there is no air… and me… see this world as full of so much… unripe fruit. You may call them humanity. But every so often one comes across a seed… with so much potential… a seed such as yourself.”
“Are you a god?” I asked him.
“A god regards me as I regard a mote of dust. No,” he said. “And that mote of dust is you.”
“A mote of dust that will not move,” Galibi added. “Stubborn.”
“You will stay in line, and I… we, Galibi and I, shall ensure that.”